Competitions

Heaving Line

In days of seafaring, it was necessary to throw a line to shore or another vessel in order to tie a ship off or send supplies to another ship.  Sailors would do so by throwing a heaving line with a tied weight in the end usually consisting of a monkey’s fist.

In competition cadets as part of a four-member team are given 4 tosses each, each toss can earn 10, 20, or 30 points. Missed targets score zero. Perfect score for a cadet is 120 points with the team scoring a possible 480 points.

Flag Hoist

This competition connects with our nautical past by communicating non coded messages between vessels within visual range. Cadets will use the International Code of Signals flags to relay simple words or relay a specific or standard meaning using a single flag.

In competition Cadets as part of a three-member team are given a set of cards with words on them ranging from simple 4 letter words to words that require use of extra symbol flags due to letter substitutions. They may also have to use a single flag to represent “Diver Down”

Cadets are marked on accuracy of the word hoisted. Marks are deducted for incorrect order, and or use of the substitution flags. The team with the most words completed, or highest points for spelling/accuracy will win the competition.

Present day usage of these flags is usually done for ceremonial or festive occasions where the ships message is strung from the ships rigging and read from bow to stern.

Flag Hoist team practicing at the ship using the flagpole outside our main entrance.

Semaphore

This is a signaling system based on the waving of a pair of handheld flags in a particular pattern. Flags are square and yellow and red in colour divided diagonally with the red colour on the top portion. The flags are held with arms extended in various positions, each representing each letter of the alphabet. The pattern resembles a clock face divided into eight positions (Up, Down, Out, High, Low) for each of the left and right hand.

In competition – Teams will have a sender, receiver and a recorder. A message is sent by one person using the semaphore flags. The receiver will say the letters/message he or she sees to the recorder who records the message on a sheet of recording paper. The team is marked on accuracy of the messages sent as well as received, as well as how quickly they can send the messages.

Sheers

In days of old prior to machinery, cargo on ships was moved from ship to shore, and shore to ship using two wooden spars that were tied together with line. Using line and blocks the spars are raised and lowered to move cargo from place to place.

In competition cadets as part of a six-member team will rig a sheers using proper seamanship skills. Cadets are assessed on their knots, whippings, head lashing as well as placement of blocks, strops and the load lifted.

Team Practicing Sheers at the Ship PO Munn is securing the load line to the spar as LS Brazier holds the tag line for the load, LS McFarland looks on.

Band

Cadets compete on a team of up to 31 members. There are three parts to the Band competition on which the cadets are evaluated.

  1. Uniform Inspection
  2. Compulsory Routine (set music)
  3. Freestyle Routine (music/arrangement is chosen by the team)

Cadets are inspected prior to competing. Cadets uniforms are assessed for proper badge placement, well ironed, boots shone, hair is proper, free of lint and pennants. Cadets then complete a compulsory routine that has been assigned by the region, this routine is more formal. After the compulsory routine is completed, the Drum Major then reports, and the team will then complete a freestyle routine with the team being more free to express their musicality and showmanship.

As a part of the team’s points, they are evaluated on their uniforms, the precision of their musicality, drill movements, ability to follow their drum major’s commands/orders, use of parade space etc. Team captains are marked on completing the sequence in order, power of command, bearing, control of their team and use of the parade square space.

Drill

Cadets compete on a team of up to 16 members. There are three parts to the drill competition on which the cadets are evaluated.

  1. Uniform Inspection
  2. Compulsory Sequence
  3. Supplementary Sequence

Cadets are inspected prior to competing. Cadet’s uniforms are assessed for proper badge placement, well ironed, boots shone, hair is proper, free of lint and pennants. Cadets then complete a mandatory drill sequence that has been practiced beforehand, that the team captain will deliver to the team. After the mandatory routine is completed, the team captain then reports, and the team will then complete an entirely silent routine with no cues or commands from the team captain.

As a part of the team’s points, they are evaluated on their uniforms, the precision of their drill movements, ability to follow their captains’ commands/orders. Team captains are marked on completing the sequence in order, power of command, bearing, control of their team and use of the parade square space.

Marksmanship-Take Aim!

The Cadet Marksmanship Program is a challenging and competitive sports program accessible to all cadets. It develops skills through superior training and Olympic-style competition. This is why every year, thousands of cadets participate in this fun and rewarding program.

Cadets have the opportunity to participate in a series of competitions at the local level that culminate in provincial/territorial competitions and an annual National Cadet Marksmanship Championship.

Set your Sights High

  • promote safe handling of rifles;
  • build self-esteem and practice focus;
  • promote sportsmanship, sport etiquette and self-discipline;
  • develops high level of marksmanship technical skills;
  • provide personal challenge and achievement opportunities.